Category Archives: Morality

David Cameron’s bad week matched only by Arsenal’s

Only a mob of violent leftists could make a tax-avoiding Tory look good

When angry leftists and violent, lawless thugs march angrily through the streets of London, I have a tendency (as was the case yesterday) to be more concerned about the well-being of the police officers present than about the political exploits of parading lunatics. I don’t think I’ve seen such a disproportionate and childish response to the actions (which are buried in the past) of a politician. I was particularly angered by pictures of bloodied female police officers, who in attempting to do their jobs, were cut and bruised thanks in no small part to the petulance of Left-wing hate mobs.

The Prime Minister was quick to apologise for any past connections with legal tax avoidance (something many of his critics are, I suspect, also connected to in some way), despite being pushed on the issue multiple times before admitting what he had to hide. My personal view is that those demanding Cameron resign yesterday were attempting to ride the waves of momentum instigated in Iceland just a couple of days ago.

David Cameron hasn’t done anything wrong from a legal perspective, contrary to what the malevolence of protesters may imply. His unfortunate week has been blown up out of all sensible proportion for the purpose of political point-scoring. Many Left-wing figures in the media, as well as newspapers and politicians have been quick to denounce Dave’s dealings as immoral and deceitful, and have been awfully quick to call for his head.

I’m not a fan of David Cameron for various reasons with which I will not bore readers, but I don’t think he should resign over connections to tax avoidance. His £30,000 worth of shares in an offshore fund was sold before he became Prime Minister, and the heckling he has received over his father’s behaviour has been rather petulant. As world leaders go, Cameron is actually remarkably uncorrupt, fair and responsible. Recent bumps aside, he clearly enjoys the role of Prime Minister, and likely isn’t willing to give up the post any time soon.

Arsenal’s annual capitulation comes a little late

Credit to Arsenal and Arsene Wenger for taking us along for the ride until at least April this season. Usually, early March is spring time for cracks at The Emirates, and Arsenal fans are left, bound to helplessness as they watch their team’s title chances erode away for all to see. To fans of rival teams, it must be quite hysterical by now.

Yesterday’s game at Upton Park was fantastically entertaining, but a game not won is a bad game for a title chaser. Particularly bizarre was Wenger’s decision to leave Petr Cech on the bench as he watched replacement David Ospina prove once more that he, in fact, does not have what it takes to play consistently for a top team between the sticks. Perhaps I’m being a little harsh, but Arsenal’s defensive display yesterday afternoon was certainly one to forget. Gabriel, too, was poor.

Though at times we looked unstoppable going forward (I can think of several attractive attacking sequences which, if fruitful, could quite easily have killed the game off in the first half), fans could sense that the team lacked any real desire or coordination that title winners would have been capable of in order to see out victory. Commentators and neutrals may have enjoyed the six-goal feast, but I, being somewhat ambitious, did not.

To compound upon this misery, Tottenham look set to finish above Arsenal for the first time in over two decades this season; a fact which Arsenal fans will do their utmost to pretend does not bother them, whilst it secretly eats away at their patience. Patience, by the way, which is gradually thinning thanks in large part to Arsene Wenger’s repeated failures.

I didn’t bother to read or listen to Wenger’s post-match comments, but no doubt over the next couple of months he’ll trot out the same, recycled nonsense about financial restraints, injuries (which to my astonishment seem to linger even with new medical staff) and lacking a component which will not be drafted in during the summer. The refreshing success of Leicester this season has, at least, been a timely reminder that many of Arsene’s managerial excuses can now be put swiftly to bed.